The History and Beauty of Water: Pulgas Water Temple, Redwood City, CA

Pulgas Water Temple, Photo by Eva Barrows
Pulgas Water Temple, Photo by Eva Barrows

The Pulgas Water Temple is a celebration of man’s ingenuity, a reminder of a long controversial process that brought water from Yosemite to the people of the San Francisco Bay Area. I was curious about how a replica of an ancient Greek structure came to be nestled in the rolling hills of Redwood City, CA. So I read the educational signs along the walking path. I found that the Hetch Hetchy aqueduct was created based on Roman and Greek engineering methods, and ends at this spot with the water finally flowing into the adjoining Crystal Springs reservoir.

Rushing Water, Photo by Eva Barrows
Rushing Water, Photo by Eva Barrows

As I walked around I could hear the rushing of water like a great river making its way to a waterfall or the flow of water at a waterslide park, yet I could see no evidence for what I was hearing. I walked around the Temple itself admiring the columns and listening as the noise grew louder. I looked toward the reservoir in the distance and saw the source of the rushing water. The outlet of the aqueduct is hidden below the Pulgas Water Temple parkland and steers the water in open air beyond the park to the reservoir.

Crystal Springs Reservoir, Photo by Eva Barrows
Crystal Springs Reservoir, Photo by Eva Barrows

The surrounding landscape of moist coastal forest, sparkling water of the reservoir and crisp bright blue sky was simply stunning on this winter day. The beauty of the setting is so much appreciated, that at least two bridal groups were planning their upcoming weddings at the Temple during the time I was there. The Temple is an ideal place to have a romantic picnic or just sit and relax for a while. I soaked up some much needed warm sun and fresh air on my visit.

Author at Temple, Selfie by Eva Barrows
Author at Temple, Selfie by Eva Barrows

Visit the park Monday through Friday 9am to 4pm at 56 Cañada Road, Redwood City, CA 94062.

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Women Demanding Change: Guest Blog Post at Unhealed Wound

This week I’m at Diana Paul’s blog unhealed wound with a television review of Amazon Studio’s original series “Good Girls Revolt.”

I’m thankful to the real life women who took a stand to be treated equal in the workplace and made society change.

Check out my review at unhealed wound then binge watch “Good Girls Revolt” this holiday season!

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Little Free Library: Neighborhood Destination, Belmont CA

redwoodcitylfl
Redwood City LFL, photo by John Barrows

I feel somewhat isolated living in an apartment complex, nestled alongside other complexes built on the side of a hill in Belmont, CA. I love to walk but am challenged when I walk out my front door. The hill I’m immediately confronted with is the neighborhood equivalent of Yosemite’s Half Dome. So rather than walk around here I often drive to places that are flat to get my exercise.

Yesterday my husband alerted me to the fact that there are random tiny libraries popping up in local neighborhoods. He found one in Redwood City, CA in someone’s front yard. It’s a box with a sleek modern look mounted on a post. The sides are clear so you can get a great look at the books inside!

He recalled seeing another one of these structures in our neighborhood, just across the busy main street that cuts through the hill and then back onto an off street. My interest was piqued. I looked the spot up on Google Maps. It wasn’t too far away, walking distance, I hoped it was flat terrain all the way.

I put my raincoat on as it has been a drizzly couple of days, eased open the umbrella and took off across the street. The wet sky, smell of cut grass and forest trees made me think I was tramping into a mystical world.

Eva's Dream Home, photo by Eva Barrows
Eva’s Dream Home, photo by Eva Barrows

I passed construction workers building a foundation in a pit where a new home would soon sprout. Only half of the homes had sidewalks, so I had to walk in the street most of the way, making the path seem even more rural. I ambled by my dream house and swooned. It reminded me of something out of Anne of Green Gables.

Belmont LFL, photo by Eva Barrows
Belmont LFL, photo by Eva Barrows

Finally, I approached something on a post that wasn’t a mailbox. I had found the Little Free Library in someone’s side yard. I felt funny standing there in the street gawking at this tiny structure. I took a few pictures of it and hoped no one was watching me from a window as I checked it out. I opened the little door and smelled the wood interior. There was a book in there by Sarah Vowell that I’ve read, The Wordy Shipmates.

I didn’t take any books because one, I have way too many books already and two I didn’t bring a book to exchange. To participate in the Little Free Library, you’re supposed to exchange one of your books for one of their books so that they don’t run out of books! It’s not enforced but still I would feel bad if the library was depleted.

In my search for the Little Free Library, I not only found the structure I was looking for but I also discovered a whole other area of my neighborhood that happens to be on flat walkable land.

Do you have a Little Free Library in your neighborhood?

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