Twice Removed: Lathrop House, Redwood City, CA

Lathrop House, Photo by Eva Barrows
Lathrop House, Photo by Eva Barrows

The Lathrop House wasn’t always located only three-yards back from a busy downtown street with no front or back yard. Just the opposite is true. It was originally a grand estate with a number of service buildings surrounding it, unattached kitchen, outhouse…that sort of thing. All on beautifully landscaped and gardened acreage in Redwood City, CA.

But now, the ornate by modern standards, home is cruelly close to a street full of people rushing to the towering superior court house across the street. Encroaching new construction behind the home and on all sides, make it seem as though the Lathrop House is the structure that doesn’t belong.

The house is no stranger to being made to move. It was moved to the back of its own land to make room for a school and then moved again by a new owner. That’s a lot of moving especially for something built in 1863.

The Redwood City Heritage Association opens the house twice a month for visitors to explore the interior. I recommend going on the third Saturday of the month to avoid the crazy parking situation on the other day it’s open, the second Wednesday of the month. Yes, parking really is that bad.

Visitors have full access to the first and second floors of the home with a docent tour. Lathrop House was constructed with local redwood. The owners decided to have the redwood look like more “expensive” wood by having the visible trim painted to look like oak. Original wallpaper was uncovered in the house during restoration. There was enough left to be reproduced for a full repapering of the home.

My favorite part of the tour was the walk-in closet off the master bedroom. The docent advised that the closet may not have been original to the home. Some Victorian era clothing was on display and a wool swimsuit hung on one of the closet doors caught my attention. I always pictured wool swimsuits being made from thick wool that would be heavy with water once it got wet. However, the wool cloth was very thin and did not feel scratchy to the touch.

While I was inside the Lathrop House, I got to peek into what life was like 150 years ago for about forty-five minutes. Then I walked out into the loud, growing and groaning modern world and couldn’t help wishing I could stay in the past a little while longer.

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Allied Arts Guild: Local Secret, Menlo Park CA

Spanish Colonial Building, Photo by Eva Barrows
Spanish Colonial Building, Photo by Eva Barrows

Menlo Park, CA has swallowed up a secret under the canopy of its tree-lined streets. A few un-exciting brown historical marker signs on the main street, weakly hint at the existence of something worth checking out. These signs have never caught my attention.

“How’d you hear about us?” The grandma aged store clerk asked me as I perused the Artisan Shop.

“Online,” I’d said not thinking about the reasoning behind her question. My attention was on the hand-crafted fur embellished Eskimo doll and red-faced European style marionettes for sale.

“Good job,” she said as she worked at straightening some hanging jewelry.

Woodworking Barn, Photo by John Barrows
Woodworking Barn, Photo by John Barrows

My husband, an artist, was intrigued when I told him I’d found a hidden art guild he’d never heard of nestled into a Menlo Park neighborhood. He eagerly agreed to come out with me during a break in January rain storms to explore the Allied Arts Guild compound with me.

Some buildings like the sheep shearing shed turned pottery studio and the barn which is now a woodworking shop are original 1800’s era ranch buildings. Other buildings were re-imagined or newly constructed in the Spanish Colonial style around 1930 when the Allied Arts Guild was formed.

Courtyard, Photo by Eva Barrows
Courtyard, Photo by Eva Barrows

Artwork created in the 1930’s has seamlessly melded into the idyllic ambiance of the Guild’s grounds. The tiered courtyard fountain creates the soothing sound of trickling water. A colorful fresco painted onto the recess of the music room’s exterior wall. Pottery overflows with plant life or is simply lined up next to other pots silently welcoming visitors.

We poked our heads into shop windows and found that about half of them were open that day. There was a closed quilt shop that featured piles of colorful folded stacked fabric which I would have loved to browse through. The pottery studio was open and featured Japanese style details such as bud vases attached to lengths of bamboo. My husband was disappointed to find the Portola Art Gallery was closed for the day. The gallery represents current local artists in a wide variety of art styles.

On weekends my husband and I usually move slow and thankfully we arrived just before the Blue Garden Café stopped serving lunch. I ordered a steak panini and my hubby ordered a turkey and cheese panini. I was delighted by the tender and tasty meat and he was pleasantly surprised by apple slices in his sandwich! The meals were on the expensive side but we didn’t mind too much because we enjoyed every bite.

Garden Walkway, Photo by Eva Barrows
Garden Walkway, Photo by Eva Barrows

We walked the brick-lined garden path and noticed a few other couples exploring the unique grounds. A group of parents with young boisterous children came to play amongst the adobe style courtyards and pathways.

The day became even more gray threatening rain. It was time to take shelter so we headed to the car. I watched as the parents slipped back out to the road, pulling children in wagons or chaperoning an unsteady tricycle. This recreation seeking group knew the secret of the Allied Arts Guild but to them the Guild was just a part of the neighborhood.

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Follow Me to Carmel-By-The-Sea, CA

Monastery Beach, photo by Eva Barrows
Monastery Beach, photo by Eva Barrows

Carmel is the perfect distance from the San Francisco Bay Area for a quick weekend get-away. It’s beautiful with lush green hills, farmland, rugged coastline and crashing Pacific Ocean waves. There are tons of activities and places to explore in Carmel. Here are the places I explored with my spouse on our mid-January trip to Carmel.

1) On The Way: Moss Landing

On the way to Carmel, we drove over the Santa Cruz Mountains. Santa Cruz or Capitola are both seaside towns with lots of character and would be great places to stop for lunch or sightseeing on the way to Carmel. We decided to keep driving on HWY 1 towards Carmel and ultimately stopped in Moss Landing for a much needed lunch break.

Moss Landing, photo by Eva Barrows
Moss Landing, photo by Eva Barrows

Moss Landing’s pair of power plant smoke stacks are the defining landmark of the fishing village. The stacks interrupt the marshland and harbor feel of the area with their industrial purpose.

Sea Otters, photo by John Barrows
Sea Otters, photo by John Barrows

We had our lunch at Sea Harvest Fish Market & Restaurant. The restaurant is located at the harbor’s entrance channel where fishing boats come in and out from sea. Kayakers pass by and so do large families of sea otters! The restaurant has great tasting seafood and the best view to take in all of the harbor activities.

2) Where to Stay: Carmel Mission Inn

Hotel Cow, photo by Eva Barrows
Hotel Cow, photo by Eva Barrows

Carmel Mission Inn is my go-to hotel when staying in Carmel. I’ve been there several times and love the fact that it has updated amenities and a spa-like feel. It’s an affordable place to stay when compared to other hotels in the area. The hotel is right off of HWY 1 and there’s plenty of shopping and eating choices in walking distance.

The moment we got our bags up to our room, I started changing into my bathing suit for a dip in the hot tub. The pool area is nicely furnished with sun chairs and beds to relax on. There’s even a statue of a life-sized happy cow who watches over the swimmers in the heated pool.

3) What to do When It’s Dark: Del Monte Shopping Center

If you go to Carmel in the winter months, it may be sunny and warm during the day but the nights get frigid! Both nights on our quick trip to Carmel were spent at the indoor movie theater, Cinemark Monterey 13, at Del Monte Shopping Center in Monterey. The mall is a quick ten-minute drive on HWY 1 from the Carmel Mission Inn or any other hotel in Carmel.

When waiting for the next movie time to roll around you can do some mall shopping or hang out in one of the many restaurants to grab dinner. We went to Islands Fine Burgers & Drinks. As the name says they serve burgers as well as a selection of tacos and your favorite island drinks. I got my buzz on with the help of a Mai Tai and my husband stayed smooth with a Pina Colada.

Then we watched “Hidden Figures” the first night and “La La Land” the second. I enjoyed both films and was glad we found something to do after the sunset over the ocean.

4) Breakfast, Breakfast, Breakfast! From Scratch Restaurant

From Scratch Restaurant, photo by Eva Barrows
From Scratch Restaurant, photo by Eva Barrows

From Scratch Restaurant made my list because of two things. One it’s a two-minute walk from the hotel, located at the Barnyard shops next door. And two, it was featured on The Food Network’s “Diners, Drive-ins and Dives” so it has to be great.

There’s close quarters indoor dining and outdoor patio seating with room for dogs to come along. I’ve visited From Scratch a few times and decided I like the homemade cinnamon bun bread dressed as French toast. My husband tried the crab omelet this time and ate it all.

I just watched the “Triple D” review of the restaurant and found that the “extreme sausage biscuits and gravy” featured on the show doesn’t look too daunting to eat. I have new-found courage to try it the next time I’m in Carmel.

5) Do Not Miss Sunday Brunch at Mission Ranch Restaurant

Mission Ranch and Restaurant, Photo by John Barrows
Mission Ranch and Restaurant, Photo by John Barrows

The Mission Ranch Hotel and Restaurant is a short three-minute drive from our home base. It’s a historic hotel with multiple buildings facing ranch-land. The most photographed flock of sheep in Carmel live at the ranch. You can hear the sheep munching on grass as they mow the pasture. They also terrorize the lone tree in their yard by tugging at it and scratching themselves on it.

Brunch is only on Sundays from 10 am to 1:30 pm and is $40 per person. We went on a beautiful sunny morning and were fortunate to be seated on the patio with a vibrant view of Carmel’s coastline. Beyond the lush green field, is a sandy beach that leads out to the blue ocean and a craggy rock point.

Since this is an all-you-can-eat meal my husband stacked his plate high with, prime rib, beef rib, eggs benedict and tender salmon, enough food to get him through the entire day. I tried not to stuff myself right away, so started with a made to order omelet and chocolate covered strawberry. I went back for seconds and picked up spinach salad, French toast and key lime pie. I enjoyed the hot coffee and a mimosa which were included in the price. In conclusion, the food was delicious and the best buffet we’ve ever had. That’s saying a lot!

6) Walk it Off at Point Lobos State Natural Reserve

Point Lobos, photo by Eva Barrows
Point Lobos, photo by Eva Barrows

Carmel is blessed with a ruggedly beautiful coastline. One of the best places to explore the coast is at Point Lobos State Natural Reserve. The entrance gate to Point Lobos is in the middle of a wooded forest that leads to your pick of a rocky beach or sheer cliff bluff. Wildlife of the sea, shore and air abound at the reserve.

One of my favorite things to do at the ocean is whale watch. I was not disappointed on this winter’s day to see puff upon puff of whale spouts in the distance. Yes, I wouldn’t mind if the whales were a little closer to shore but just knowing they are out there makes me happy. I also heard the “arf arf” call of sea lions at Point Lobos.

Point Lobos is a photographer’s wonderland. My husband waited for the right moment to photograph the sun’s light passing through a wave to capture the crystal essence of the water.

7) Carmel Art Galleries and Shops

Shops, photo by Eva Barrows
Shops, photo by Eva Barrows

Everyone thinks of art galleries when they think of Carmel. Or at least they should. It’s estimated that there are one hundred galleries concentrated in downtown Carmel. My husband is an artist so gallery perusing is always on our list of things to do in Carmel. A few of his favorite galleries are the Wyland and New Masters Gallery.

The architecture of the buildings downtown is historical and even fairytale like. Just looking at the buildings and imagining what fairytale they are inspired by is almost as interesting as looking in the shops themselves.

My favorite place to shop in downtown Carmel is the Sockshop where I just picked up a supply of cute and warm socks to get me through winter.

8) Carmel Sunset Beach

Carmel Sunset Beach, Photo by Eva Barrows
Carmel Sunset Beach, Photo by Eva Barrows

After a morning of gallery hopping walk or drive the rest of the way down Ocean Ave and hang out on the sandy Carmel Sunset Beach. This seems to be a local favorite because everyone and their dog is playing hard out in the waves and wet sand. I like to sit on a blanket and dogs like to come up to me and see what I’m up to on this beach.

The beach is part of the semi-circle of Carmel Bay. The waves are calmer in the bay and dolphins like to put on shows for people watching from the beach. This is a great place to relax, enjoy a snack and watch all of the action laid out in front of you.

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The History and Beauty of Water: Pulgas Water Temple, Redwood City, CA

Pulgas Water Temple, Photo by Eva Barrows
Pulgas Water Temple, Photo by Eva Barrows

The Pulgas Water Temple is a celebration of man’s ingenuity, a reminder of a long controversial process that brought water from Yosemite to the people of the San Francisco Bay Area. I was curious about how a replica of an ancient Greek structure came to be nestled in the rolling hills of Redwood City, CA. So I read the educational signs along the walking path. I found that the Hetch Hetchy aqueduct was created based on Roman and Greek engineering methods, and ends at this spot with the water finally flowing into the adjoining Crystal Springs reservoir.

Rushing Water, Photo by Eva Barrows
Rushing Water, Photo by Eva Barrows

As I walked around I could hear the rushing of water like a great river making its way to a waterfall or the flow of water at a waterslide park, yet I could see no evidence for what I was hearing. I walked around the Temple itself admiring the columns and listening as the noise grew louder. I looked toward the reservoir in the distance and saw the source of the rushing water. The outlet of the aqueduct is hidden below the Pulgas Water Temple parkland and steers the water in open air beyond the park to the reservoir.

Crystal Springs Reservoir, Photo by Eva Barrows
Crystal Springs Reservoir, Photo by Eva Barrows

The surrounding landscape of moist coastal forest, sparkling water of the reservoir and crisp bright blue sky was simply stunning on this winter day. The beauty of the setting is so much appreciated, that at least two bridal groups were planning their upcoming weddings at the Temple during the time I was there. The Temple is an ideal place to have a romantic picnic or just sit and relax for a while. I soaked up some much needed warm sun and fresh air on my visit.

Author at Temple, Selfie by Eva Barrows
Author at Temple, Selfie by Eva Barrows

Visit the park Monday through Friday 9am to 4pm at 56 Cañada Road, Redwood City, CA 94062.

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Little Free Library: Neighborhood Destination, Belmont CA

redwoodcitylfl
Redwood City LFL, photo by John Barrows

I feel somewhat isolated living in an apartment complex, nestled alongside other complexes built on the side of a hill in Belmont, CA. I love to walk but am challenged when I walk out my front door. The hill I’m immediately confronted with is the neighborhood equivalent of Yosemite’s Half Dome. So rather than walk around here I often drive to places that are flat to get my exercise.

Yesterday my husband alerted me to the fact that there are random tiny libraries popping up in local neighborhoods. He found one in Redwood City, CA in someone’s front yard. It’s a box with a sleek modern look mounted on a post. The sides are clear so you can get a great look at the books inside!

He recalled seeing another one of these structures in our neighborhood, just across the busy main street that cuts through the hill and then back onto an off street. My interest was piqued. I looked the spot up on Google Maps. It wasn’t too far away, walking distance, I hoped it was flat terrain all the way.

I put my raincoat on as it has been a drizzly couple of days, eased open the umbrella and took off across the street. The wet sky, smell of cut grass and forest trees made me think I was tramping into a mystical world.

Eva's Dream Home, photo by Eva Barrows
Eva’s Dream Home, photo by Eva Barrows

I passed construction workers building a foundation in a pit where a new home would soon sprout. Only half of the homes had sidewalks, so I had to walk in the street most of the way, making the path seem even more rural. I ambled by my dream house and swooned. It reminded me of something out of Anne of Green Gables.

Belmont LFL, photo by Eva Barrows
Belmont LFL, photo by Eva Barrows

Finally, I approached something on a post that wasn’t a mailbox. I had found the Little Free Library in someone’s side yard. I felt funny standing there in the street gawking at this tiny structure. I took a few pictures of it and hoped no one was watching me from a window as I checked it out. I opened the little door and smelled the wood interior. There was a book in there by Sarah Vowell that I’ve read, The Wordy Shipmates.

I didn’t take any books because one, I have way too many books already and two I didn’t bring a book to exchange. To participate in the Little Free Library, you’re supposed to exchange one of your books for one of their books so that they don’t run out of books! It’s not enforced but still I would feel bad if the library was depleted.

In my search for the Little Free Library, I not only found the structure I was looking for but I also discovered a whole other area of my neighborhood that happens to be on flat walkable land.

Do you have a Little Free Library in your neighborhood?

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Oh Deer! Not Skittish at Crystal Springs Reservoir

The deer at Crystal Springs trail in San Mateo, CA don’t hesitate to graze wherever they want. These guys didn’t flinch when runners, families and bicyclists passed them by.

Crystal Springs Reservoir, Photo by Eva Barrows
Crystal Springs Reservoir, Photo by Eva Barrows
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Searching for Vietnamese Sandwiches: Kat’s Vietnam House Restaurant Review

I had a hankering for a good Vietnamese sandwich. You know, tasty meat mixed with kimchi on a French sourdough roll. The sandwich seems out of place at an Asian restaurant but makes sense when you remember the French colonized the region back in the day.

Kat's Vietnam House, photo by Eva Barrows
Kat’s Vietnam House, photo by Eva Barrows

I looked up local Vietnamese restaurants and found that Kat’s Vietnam House serves the sandwiches I was looking for. Kat’s is located in an industrial meets family friendly area of San Mateo, in the Laurie Meadows strip mall at 35 Laurie Meadows Dr., San Mateo CA 94403.

Interior of restaurant, photo by Eva Barrows
Interior of restaurant, photo by Eva Barrows

When I arrived around 1pm, I was the only customer and a few others trickled in while I was there. The interior was dark due to limited natural lighting. Some of the tables were used as restaurant/office supply storage however there were plenty of available places to dine. The walls were decorated with the pictured large repeating motif.

Variety of noodles, photo by Eva Barrows
Variety of noodles, photo by Eva Barrows

I enjoyed the visual aid of the different types of noodles the restaurant uses. Each type is labeled in English and Vietnamese so that you are sure to order the correct noodle, preventing order confusion.

The waitress greeted me promptly. She answered my questions about how the meat is sliced for the sandwiches – advising the pork is a cutlet and the chicken was in strips. I ordered the chicken sandwich and a Thai iced tea. The meal was brought out to me within ten minutes.

Vietnamese sandwich with Thai iced tea, photo by Eva Barrows
Vietnamese sandwich with Thai iced tea, photo by Eva Barrows

The fixings (lettuce, lightly pickled carrot and cabbage, cilantro), chunks of dark skin-on chicken meat in a sweet sauce, and fresh French roll were all there. The bread was of a flaky consistency when I had been expecting a lightly toasted interior and sourdough crispiness. The Thai iced tea was sweet and refreshing.
I enjoyed my lunch at Kat’s but am still on the hunt for the *perfect* Vietnamese sandwich because I’m a sucker for the lightly toasted!

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What’s the Best Winter Vacation Destination?

Island of Kauai, HI, Photo by Eva Barrows
Island of Kauai, HI, Photo by Eva Barrows
Lake Tahoe, CA at Heavenly Resort, Photo by Eva Barrows
Lake Tahoe, CA at Heavenly Resort, Photo by Eva Barrows

There’s no place like home for the holidays but let’s just say you had a little cash and a little time to go somewhere…where would you go? Would you seek out the never ending summer of a place like Hawaii or play in the white snow somewhere like Tahoe? Doesn’t matter if I’m in a cozy winter cabin OR bathing in the tropical ocean, my priority would be the same in either setting – warmth!

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Gold Rush City Crawl


The Gold Rush era downtowns of Grass Valley, CA and Nevada City, CA are only four miles away from each other. Start your day of art gallery ogling, historic sightseeing, and ice cream licking in one town, then hop on over to the other and start the cycle all over again! Fall is a great time of year to visit the area as the trees are changing color and the temperature is just right for a stroll down Main Street.

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