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Follow Me to Carmel-By-The-Sea, CA

Monastery Beach, photo by Eva Barrows
Monastery Beach, photo by Eva Barrows

Carmel is the perfect distance from the San Francisco Bay Area for a quick weekend get-away. It’s beautiful with lush green hills, farmland, rugged coastline and crashing Pacific Ocean waves. There are tons of activities and places to explore in Carmel. Here are the places I explored with my spouse on our mid-January trip to Carmel.

1) On The Way: Moss Landing

On the way to Carmel, we drove over the Santa Cruz Mountains. Santa Cruz or Capitola are both seaside towns with lots of character and would be great places to stop for lunch or sightseeing on the way to Carmel. We decided to keep driving on HWY 1 towards Carmel and ultimately stopped in Moss Landing for a much needed lunch break.

Moss Landing, photo by Eva Barrows
Moss Landing, photo by Eva Barrows

Moss Landing’s pair of power plant smoke stacks are the defining landmark of the fishing village. The stacks interrupt the marshland and harbor feel of the area with their industrial purpose.

Sea Otters, photo by John Barrows
Sea Otters, photo by John Barrows

We had our lunch at Sea Harvest Fish Market & Restaurant. The restaurant is located at the harbor’s entrance channel where fishing boats come in and out from sea. Kayakers pass by and so do large families of sea otters! The restaurant has great tasting seafood and the best view to take in all of the harbor activities.

2) Where to Stay: Carmel Mission Inn

Hotel Cow, photo by Eva Barrows
Hotel Cow, photo by Eva Barrows

Carmel Mission Inn is my go-to hotel when staying in Carmel. I’ve been there several times and love the fact that it has updated amenities and a spa-like feel. It’s an affordable place to stay when compared to other hotels in the area. The hotel is right off of HWY 1 and there’s plenty of shopping and eating choices in walking distance.

The moment we got our bags up to our room, I started changing into my bathing suit for a dip in the hot tub. The pool area is nicely furnished with sun chairs and beds to relax on. There’s even a statue of a life-sized happy cow who watches over the swimmers in the heated pool.

3) What to do When It’s Dark: Del Monte Shopping Center

If you go to Carmel in the winter months, it may be sunny and warm during the day but the nights get frigid! Both nights on our quick trip to Carmel were spent at the indoor movie theater, Cinemark Monterey 13, at Del Monte Shopping Center in Monterey. The mall is a quick ten-minute drive on HWY 1 from the Carmel Mission Inn or any other hotel in Carmel.

When waiting for the next movie time to roll around you can do some mall shopping or hang out in one of the many restaurants to grab dinner. We went to Islands Fine Burgers & Drinks. As the name says they serve burgers as well as a selection of tacos and your favorite island drinks. I got my buzz on with the help of a Mai Tai and my husband stayed smooth with a Pina Colada.

Then we watched “Hidden Figures” the first night and “La La Land” the second. I enjoyed both films and was glad we found something to do after the sunset over the ocean.

4) Breakfast, Breakfast, Breakfast! From Scratch Restaurant

From Scratch Restaurant, photo by Eva Barrows
From Scratch Restaurant, photo by Eva Barrows

From Scratch Restaurant made my list because of two things. One it’s a two-minute walk from the hotel, located at the Barnyard shops next door. And two, it was featured on The Food Network’s “Diners, Drive-ins and Dives” so it has to be great.

There’s close quarters indoor dining and outdoor patio seating with room for dogs to come along. I’ve visited From Scratch a few times and decided I like the homemade cinnamon bun bread dressed as French toast. My husband tried the crab omelet this time and ate it all.

I just watched the “Triple D” review of the restaurant and found that the “extreme sausage biscuits and gravy” featured on the show doesn’t look too daunting to eat. I have new-found courage to try it the next time I’m in Carmel.

5) Do Not Miss Sunday Brunch at Mission Ranch Restaurant

Mission Ranch and Restaurant, Photo by John Barrows
Mission Ranch and Restaurant, Photo by John Barrows

The Mission Ranch Hotel and Restaurant is a short three-minute drive from our home base. It’s a historic hotel with multiple buildings facing ranch-land. The most photographed flock of sheep in Carmel live at the ranch. You can hear the sheep munching on grass as they mow the pasture. They also terrorize the lone tree in their yard by tugging at it and scratching themselves on it.

Brunch is only on Sundays from 10 am to 1:30 pm and is $40 per person. We went on a beautiful sunny morning and were fortunate to be seated on the patio with a vibrant view of Carmel’s coastline. Beyond the lush green field, is a sandy beach that leads out to the blue ocean and a craggy rock point.

Since this is an all-you-can-eat meal my husband stacked his plate high with, prime rib, beef rib, eggs benedict and tender salmon, enough food to get him through the entire day. I tried not to stuff myself right away, so started with a made to order omelet and chocolate covered strawberry. I went back for seconds and picked up spinach salad, French toast and key lime pie. I enjoyed the hot coffee and a mimosa which were included in the price. In conclusion, the food was delicious and the best buffet we’ve ever had. That’s saying a lot!

6) Walk it Off at Point Lobos State Natural Reserve

Point Lobos, photo by Eva Barrows
Point Lobos, photo by Eva Barrows

Carmel is blessed with a ruggedly beautiful coastline. One of the best places to explore the coast is at Point Lobos State Natural Reserve. The entrance gate to Point Lobos is in the middle of a wooded forest that leads to your pick of a rocky beach or sheer cliff bluff. Wildlife of the sea, shore and air abound at the reserve.

One of my favorite things to do at the ocean is whale watch. I was not disappointed on this winter’s day to see puff upon puff of whale spouts in the distance. Yes, I wouldn’t mind if the whales were a little closer to shore but just knowing they are out there makes me happy. I also heard the “arf arf” call of sea lions at Point Lobos.

Point Lobos is a photographer’s wonderland. My husband waited for the right moment to photograph the sun’s light passing through a wave to capture the crystal essence of the water.

7) Carmel Art Galleries and Shops

Shops, photo by Eva Barrows
Shops, photo by Eva Barrows

Everyone thinks of art galleries when they think of Carmel. Or at least they should. It’s estimated that there are one hundred galleries concentrated in downtown Carmel. My husband is an artist so gallery perusing is always on our list of things to do in Carmel. A few of his favorite galleries are the Wyland and New Masters Gallery.

The architecture of the buildings downtown is historical and even fairytale like. Just looking at the buildings and imagining what fairytale they are inspired by is almost as interesting as looking in the shops themselves.

My favorite place to shop in downtown Carmel is the Sockshop where I just picked up a supply of cute and warm socks to get me through winter.

8) Carmel Sunset Beach

Carmel Sunset Beach, Photo by Eva Barrows
Carmel Sunset Beach, Photo by Eva Barrows

After a morning of gallery hopping walk or drive the rest of the way down Ocean Ave and hang out on the sandy Carmel Sunset Beach. This seems to be a local favorite because everyone and their dog is playing hard out in the waves and wet sand. I like to sit on a blanket and dogs like to come up to me and see what I’m up to on this beach.

The beach is part of the semi-circle of Carmel Bay. The waves are calmer in the bay and dolphins like to put on shows for people watching from the beach. This is a great place to relax, enjoy a snack and watch all of the action laid out in front of you.

Exploring Ralston Hall from the Outside, Belmont CA

Ralston Hall, Photo by Eva Barrows
Ralston Hall, Photo by Eva Barrows

I didn’t grow up in the city of Belmont. I’ve just used it as my closet for the past nine years. You know, roll out of bed, dust myself off, toss on some clothes and coast to work on HWY 280. Travel mug sloshing the coffee that was to get my day in the cubicle started off right – if there is a right way to start a day in a cubicle. So with this daily routine and weekends of slumber, chores, and quick excursions elsewhere, I missed out on most of what Belmont has to offer.

I always knew I lived in a pretty area. I couldn’t miss the rolling hills, brown in summer and green in winter. The scent of forest trees wafting at me as I make my way into Safeway, with reusable grocery bags stuffed under my arm. Ample wildlife meander near my apartment building, deer, skunk and raccoon. These are the obvious characteristics of the city, the ones you don’t have to search for.

Deer on grounds, Photo by Eva Barrows
Deer on grounds, Photo by Eva Barrows

Now that my cubicle has been packed up and sent to another state without me, I’m venturing out into my community to explore its treasures. I live off of a street called “Ralston” and gather that this is a big local name. There’s a mansion, Ralston Hall, located at Notre Dame De Namur University, that my husband and I tried to find once but we went around the wrong portion of the school. Fellow history buffs told me that they were married at the Hall, so it has to exist.

View from Ralston Hall, Photo by Eva Barrows
View from Ralston Hall, Photo by Eva Barrows

This time, I used Google Maps to confirm Ralston Hall’s location, then drove down Ralston Avenue and arrived within minutes at the mansion. The fact that I live only a few minutes away from the estate of William Ralston, the man who had much to do with the shaping of San Francisco during the Gold Rush, makes me appreciate my surroundings even more. Desire to know the history of where I am pushes me to discover and enjoy what remains of the past.

Creek, Photo by Eva Barrows
Creek, Photo by Eva Barrows

My visit was on a clear crisp January day between rain storms. Water runoff filled the creek that runs through the property, creating a soothing water feature. Parking was easy because it was the university’s winter break. Children were at recess, playing games and running around at the neighboring grammar school.

Ralston Hall from side, Photo by Eva Barrows
Ralston Hall from side, Photo by Eva Barrows

I took my time walking around the front of Ralston Hall. The building is closed to the public because it will be undergoing seismic retrofit. I’m the type of museum visitor who wants to see every room of a historic home. I want to jump the velvet rope cording off the staircase and check out the upper-level bedrooms. Yes all forty-eight of them. So, I’m sad that I can’t go into the mansion at all.

On my trip around the grounds I peer, to the best of my abilities, into any window with curtains pulled back. I glimpse two fireplaces, wood flooring and a mirror hanging on the wall. That’s as good as it gets for interior snooping.

Grotto, Photo by Eva Barrows
Grotto, Photo by Eva Barrows

I pass by what appears to be an original brick wall with white painted wood posts at top, sheltering a memorial grotto nestled next to the carriage house. It’s a peaceful retreat to the left side of the mansion. On the right side of the mansion there’s another relaxing area. It is wooded with a variety of trees, several benches for rumination, and a hedged walkway. I spy a family of deer in repose next to the hedge. They closely monitor my movements for signs of danger.

The most ornate object I find around the mansion is a decorative urn that is taller than I am. The faces of Greek Gods and an angry dragon protrude from around the urn. Purple flowers overflow from the top. I’m disturbed to find that there is a map of the university posted right next to the artifact. It’s difficult to take a picture of the urn without getting the map in the shot as well.

Urn and Ralston Hall, Photo by Eva Barrows
Urn and Ralston Hall, Photo by Eva Barrows

The university is everywhere around the mansion. I can’t help but wish there was a time buffer around Ralston Hall. I want to see it in all of its glory inside and out. Maybe in a few years the Hall will re-open and I will be able to explore the grand ballroom and opera boxes for myself. Until then I am content that the mansion is standing and there’s hope for its future survival.

The History and Beauty of Water: Pulgas Water Temple, Redwood City, CA

Pulgas Water Temple, Photo by Eva Barrows
Pulgas Water Temple, Photo by Eva Barrows

The Pulgas Water Temple is a celebration of man’s ingenuity, a reminder of a long controversial process that brought water from Yosemite to the people of the San Francisco Bay Area. I was curious about how a replica of an ancient Greek structure came to be nestled in the rolling hills of Redwood City, CA. So I read the educational signs along the walking path. I found that the Hetch Hetchy aqueduct was created based on Roman and Greek engineering methods, and ends at this spot with the water finally flowing into the adjoining Crystal Springs reservoir.

Rushing Water, Photo by Eva Barrows
Rushing Water, Photo by Eva Barrows

As I walked around I could hear the rushing of water like a great river making its way to a waterfall or the flow of water at a waterslide park, yet I could see no evidence for what I was hearing. I walked around the Temple itself admiring the columns and listening as the noise grew louder. I looked toward the reservoir in the distance and saw the source of the rushing water. The outlet of the aqueduct is hidden below the Pulgas Water Temple parkland and steers the water in open air beyond the park to the reservoir.

Crystal Springs Reservoir, Photo by Eva Barrows
Crystal Springs Reservoir, Photo by Eva Barrows

The surrounding landscape of moist coastal forest, sparkling water of the reservoir and crisp bright blue sky was simply stunning on this winter day. The beauty of the setting is so much appreciated, that at least two bridal groups were planning their upcoming weddings at the Temple during the time I was there. The Temple is an ideal place to have a romantic picnic or just sit and relax for a while. I soaked up some much needed warm sun and fresh air on my visit.

Author at Temple, Selfie by Eva Barrows
Author at Temple, Selfie by Eva Barrows

Visit the park Monday through Friday 9am to 4pm at 56 Cañada Road, Redwood City, CA 94062.

Women Demanding Change: Guest Blog Post at Unhealed Wound

This week I’m at Diana Paul’s blog unhealed wound with a television review of Amazon Studio’s original series “Good Girls Revolt.”

I’m thankful to the real life women who took a stand to be treated equal in the workplace and made society change.

Check out my review at unhealed wound then binge watch “Good Girls Revolt” this holiday season!

Little Free Library: Neighborhood Destination, Belmont CA

redwoodcitylfl
Redwood City LFL, photo by John Barrows

I feel somewhat isolated living in an apartment complex, nestled alongside other complexes built on the side of a hill in Belmont, CA. I love to walk but am challenged when I walk out my front door. The hill I’m immediately confronted with is the neighborhood equivalent of Yosemite’s Half Dome. So rather than walk around here I often drive to places that are flat to get my exercise.

Yesterday my husband alerted me to the fact that there are random tiny libraries popping up in local neighborhoods. He found one in Redwood City, CA in someone’s front yard. It’s a box with a sleek modern look mounted on a post. The sides are clear so you can get a great look at the books inside!

He recalled seeing another one of these structures in our neighborhood, just across the busy main street that cuts through the hill and then back onto an off street. My interest was piqued. I looked the spot up on Google Maps. It wasn’t too far away, walking distance, I hoped it was flat terrain all the way.

I put my raincoat on as it has been a drizzly couple of days, eased open the umbrella and took off across the street. The wet sky, smell of cut grass and forest trees made me think I was tramping into a mystical world.

Eva's Dream Home, photo by Eva Barrows
Eva’s Dream Home, photo by Eva Barrows

I passed construction workers building a foundation in a pit where a new home would soon sprout. Only half of the homes had sidewalks, so I had to walk in the street most of the way, making the path seem even more rural. I ambled by my dream house and swooned. It reminded me of something out of Anne of Green Gables.

Belmont LFL, photo by Eva Barrows
Belmont LFL, photo by Eva Barrows

Finally, I approached something on a post that wasn’t a mailbox. I had found the Little Free Library in someone’s side yard. I felt funny standing there in the street gawking at this tiny structure. I took a few pictures of it and hoped no one was watching me from a window as I checked it out. I opened the little door and smelled the wood interior. There was a book in there by Sarah Vowell that I’ve read, The Wordy Shipmates.

I didn’t take any books because one, I have way too many books already and two I didn’t bring a book to exchange. To participate in the Little Free Library, you’re supposed to exchange one of your books for one of their books so that they don’t run out of books! It’s not enforced but still I would feel bad if the library was depleted.

In my search for the Little Free Library, I not only found the structure I was looking for but I also discovered a whole other area of my neighborhood that happens to be on flat walkable land.

Do you have a Little Free Library in your neighborhood?

Black Friday: A Reflection

Black Friday holds a little of that Christmas morning anticipation and excitement that gift wrapped presents create. I had to hold myself back this morning to avoid sprinting in excitement to turn the computer on and see what great deals were ready to be had!

Image from sweetclipart.com
Image from sweetclipart.com

Last year was my first real Black Friday. Actually my shopping started on Thanksgiving as I was getting side dishes ready to take to my parent’s. I was thrilled about all of the prices I found. There were $10 bedsheet sets and $25 sneakers. I filled my online basket at Macy’s and JCPenny.

My online rush was unexpectedly crushed when the Macy’s order was cancelled. I put a few hours into figuring out what I wanted and I used up around $100 in gift cards. The system stopped my order and sent me an email announcing everything was cancelled. My jaw dropped. This couldn’t be happening. I had such a perfect lineup of items at wonderful prices. I wanted my order!

After waiting on hold for a few hours over a span of several days, I spoke with countless Macy’s customer service reps. First, I found out the reason for the cancellation. My delivery address did not match my billing address, which was what I had requested. And I was told that they wouldn’t be able to reinstate my order. I was frustrated by this because it shouldn’t have been impossible to send me my order. Then I became worried about getting my gift cards re-credited because I didn’t trust Macy’s system or representatives. The resolution to my Black Friday shopping last year with Macy’s was being refunded and never getting my deals. So this year I didn’t waste my time with them.

I went straight to JCPenny this year because my order worked out with them previously. I zeroed my online search into the items that I’ve been wanting for a while; long sleeved interestingly designed tops. Checking under my size and designers that I’ve liked in the past, I found a few things that I wanted to buy. I clicked on the items to save them in my virtual cart to look over later. When I was ready to buy, all of the items I saved had disappeared! I went back through the website to find some of them to add back but they disappeared again. I was a little miffed by this glitch but I knew from last year that sometimes online ordering takes a little perseverance. I scrolled to the bottom of the page and found there was a “recently viewed” section that had most of the things listed that I was interested in. I put these in the actual shopping cart and was able to make a purchase.

As long as my order doesn’t get cancelled, I will be getting some nice shirts and new bedding delivered to me in about a week. I look forward to opening my box like a kid on Christmas morning.

Parkside Aquatic Park: Urban Beach in San Mateo, CA

Playground and Beach, Photo by Eva Barrows
Playground and Beach, Photo by Eva Barrows

I caught a glimpse of Parkside Aquatic Park a few months back when strolling along the opposite side of the Marina Lagoon. The sandy beach with children happily playing in the water surprised me as I wouldn’t expect such a park in the middle of San Mateo!

Picnic Area, Photo by Eva Barrows
Picnic Area, Photo by Eva Barrows

Yesterday, I was in the area and decided to go take a closer look at the park. It is located in a residential area and hidden behind homes. Since it was a weekday there were few children around but adults on lunch breaks were there taking in the view.
The park was alive with shore and sea bird activity. Birds dominated the water, sand and dock. A few sand-castle remains, evidence of human activity, held strong but the sand was firmly imprinted with bird tracks.

Dock with Birds, Photo by Eva Barrows
Dock with Birds, Photo by Eva Barrows

During the weekends of May to September, California Canoe & Kayak rents out small boats and stand up paddleboards at the park. I am putting this on my list of activities to do next year. The lagoon would be a great place to try out different water sports.
Parkside Aquatic Park is a beautiful place to take in the scenery, swim when it’s warm and play in the sand!
Location: 1595 Seal St, San Mateo, CA 94403

Early Voting With the Masses

I decided to vote early this past Monday November 7th by going to the San Mateo County Registration and Elections office to get it done. I swung by the location mid-day and found there were very few places to park as the official parking lots were full. I decided to come back later in the day hoping for easy parking and short voting line. When I came back, I lucked into a good parking spot but the place was still hopping with motorists and pedestrians all eager to get their voting completed.

Long Line!, Photo by Eva Barrows
Long Line!, Photo by Eva Barrows

There was a hefty line to wait in but it went quickly. I filled out an intake form and asked for a paper ballot. Soon, my name was called and I got to pick up an individualized “vote by mail” packet and filled it out on the spot. As I was voting I overheard a poll worker say, “There have been so many votes that one of the electronic voting machines had to be rebooted.” Then pretty soon I heard her say to the people standing in line, “Great news, we’ve had so many voters that we have had to reboot the vote by mail computer.”

Vote by Mail Box, Photo by Eva Barrows
Vote by Mail Box, Photo by Eva Barrows

The line of voters was even longer when I left at 4:30pm with only a half hour left before the location closed for the day. A steady stream of cars drove up to the curbside vote by mail box and people slid their ballots in. I felt proud of the residents of San Mateo County for making sure they voted!

Oh Deer! Not Skittish at Crystal Springs Reservoir

The deer at Crystal Springs trail in San Mateo, CA don’t hesitate to graze wherever they want. These guys didn’t flinch when runners, families and bicyclists passed them by.

Crystal Springs Reservoir, Photo by Eva Barrows
Crystal Springs Reservoir, Photo by Eva Barrows

Searching for Vietnamese Sandwiches: Kat’s Vietnam House Restaurant Review

I had a hankering for a good Vietnamese sandwich. You know, tasty meat mixed with kimchi on a French sourdough roll. The sandwich seems out of place at an Asian restaurant but makes sense when you remember the French colonized the region back in the day.

Kat's Vietnam House, photo by Eva Barrows
Kat’s Vietnam House, photo by Eva Barrows

I looked up local Vietnamese restaurants and found that Kat’s Vietnam House serves the sandwiches I was looking for. Kat’s is located in an industrial meets family friendly area of San Mateo, in the Laurie Meadows strip mall at 35 Laurie Meadows Dr., San Mateo CA 94403.

Interior of restaurant, photo by Eva Barrows
Interior of restaurant, photo by Eva Barrows

When I arrived around 1pm, I was the only customer and a few others trickled in while I was there. The interior was dark due to limited natural lighting. Some of the tables were used as restaurant/office supply storage however there were plenty of available places to dine. The walls were decorated with the pictured large repeating motif.

Variety of noodles, photo by Eva Barrows
Variety of noodles, photo by Eva Barrows

I enjoyed the visual aid of the different types of noodles the restaurant uses. Each type is labeled in English and Vietnamese so that you are sure to order the correct noodle, preventing order confusion.

The waitress greeted me promptly. She answered my questions about how the meat is sliced for the sandwiches – advising the pork is a cutlet and the chicken was in strips. I ordered the chicken sandwich and a Thai iced tea. The meal was brought out to me within ten minutes.

Vietnamese sandwich with Thai iced tea, photo by Eva Barrows
Vietnamese sandwich with Thai iced tea, photo by Eva Barrows

The fixings (lettuce, lightly pickled carrot and cabbage, cilantro), chunks of dark skin-on chicken meat in a sweet sauce, and fresh French roll were all there. The bread was of a flaky consistency when I had been expecting a lightly toasted interior and sourdough crispiness. The Thai iced tea was sweet and refreshing.
I enjoyed my lunch at Kat’s but am still on the hunt for the *perfect* Vietnamese sandwich because I’m a sucker for the lightly toasted!